How helpful are student-generated course reviews?


  • Total voters
    22

brewbooks

Active Member
Yeah, I've done that course. But used that technique earlier, I didn't know how to call it :p I'm walking while studying, because of my energy. I'm constantly on foot.
I will often watch a class twice. The first time, I download video to my phone and then watch it while I walk. The second time, I watch and make notes. I find it helps me to draw out diagrams.
SynapseDraw2z.jpg
 

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
I will often watch a class twice. The first time, I download video to my phone and then watch it while I walk. The second time, I watch and make notes. I find it helps me to draw out diagrams.View attachment 317
So you create mind maps, great :)
Because you're in "older" years, I admire your work. I often watch once, and came back again, if I were missing something.
 

Carolyn

Founder at MoocLab
Staff member
Group Manager
Hi,
In Dr Nellie Deutsch's article Secure Online Testing , she talks of proctoring exams by making phone calls to the student taking the exam to check their identity.

"While students are taking their exam they receive a randomized automated phone call (or onscreen call) and are asked to explain or justify a previously submitted answer. Students who are doing their own work should have no trouble verbally answering the question that is posed to them. Students, who are not, might be able to type what someone is telling them or copy and paste an answer that they found on a website, but they will not be able to immediately articulate a proper verbal response unless they are actually familiar with the material."

What are your views on this? Do you think it would work?
 

Miiro Denis

Active Member
Hi,
In Dr Nellie Deutsch's article Secure Online Testing , she talks of proctoring exams by making phone calls to the student taking the exam to check their identity.

"While students are taking their exam they receive a randomized automated phone call (or onscreen call) and are asked to explain or justify a previously submitted answer. Students who are doing their own work should have no trouble verbally answering the question that is posed to them. Students, who are not, might be able to type what someone is telling them or copy and paste an answer that they found on a website, but they will not be able to immediately articulate a proper verbal response unless they are actually familiar with the material."

What are your views on this? Do you think it would work?
personally i think that it may not be effective to all online learners especially those without pc's secondly phone exams may fail a number of learners due to panic in them over the phone an lastly its difficult to guess whether someone is fit for exams.
 

Viv

Active Member
I also think course reviews can be very subjective so it's hard to objectively assess them. Also, your experience with a course is closely related to the amount of effort you put in it.
 

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
Reviews are pure subjective nature. If you can read exmp. 100 reviews that are similar you're going to generate opinion on that basis. I think it's helpful especially if the most of the reviews are positive.
 

brewbooks

Active Member
So you create mind maps, great :)
Because you're in "older" years, I admire your work. I often watch once, and came back again, if I were missing something.
Yes, I have been doing this most of my life. I did not know the term "mind map" so that is something I want to learn about.
 

Carolyn

Founder at MoocLab
Staff member
Group Manager
@Ankit Khandelwal, who took MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) full time for two years in lieu of attending traditional business school, speaks to CourseTalk. Hear about the challenges he encountered studying in rural India, how reviews guided his journey, and more.


Read @Ankit Khandelwal 's Tips on designing your MBA using MOOCs here.

To read MoocLab's review and rating of the CourseTalk platform, click here.
 

Carolyn

Founder at MoocLab
Staff member
Group Manager
Hi everyone,

I really enjoyed listening to Ankit's thoughts in this interview. He mentions how important it is to interact and engage while studying a MOOC. It would be great if others could share their experiences and advice on how best to interact with peers and staff on online courses.

Ankit also evokes the challenges that people face when studying online in rural areas. Please share what challenges you have faced and how you resolved them?

I look forward to reading your posts below.

Thanks :)
 

kevin peter

Active Member
Can any student tell me personally suitable technique of undertaking analysis intended for dissertation, It is really daunting process in my opinion. I am planning receive guide from buy coursework from the top writing service to discover ways to carry out appropriate dissertation exploration. Can certainly anyone give me some tips about how to begin dissertation analysis inside organized and also successful manner.
 

Paul Morris

Active Member
I have completed around 120 courses since April 2013 and probably started and dropped a somewhat greater number (I don't really keep track of them).

The first course completed was Computational Photography on Coursera (an interesting course which I'm surprised hasn't been repeated).
 

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
Update, I have finished 60+ from 2012. I really don't see numbers as important as knowledge gain from it. :)
 

Paul Morris

Active Member
While I have voted for 'classroom lecture' it really depends on the content. Some topics work better with a combination of 'talking head' and annotated Powerpoints or active displays demonstrating programming, for example. I don't think I've ever seen a video consisting entirely of talking head shots, they are invariably mixed with some other content.

I have to say that while I admire Sal Khan's aims I really find his presentation style hard going, particularly his habit of v-e-r-y-- s-l-o-w-l-y repeating every word as he writes it on screen. At the opposite extreme, the edX course 8.MechCx is using lectures videos from Colorado Boulder which have a very tight editing to cut the one hour lectures to 35-40 minutes. They literally trim out fractions of a second while the lecturer writes a word on the blackboard or walks from one side to the other of the room (pretty much any time he isn't talking). I've never seen this before and it can be a bit disconcerting at first.

Although this poll doesn't ask, I'd also add that overall, I prefer longer lectures over short 'bite-sized' segments.
 
Last edited:

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
I can see that people are interested in informal education and that is for a praise. MOOC is expanding heavily from 2012, and I'm really happy for that.

But also, I can see that too many people are finishing let's say 60- 100 courses per year.

Don't get me wrong, but I can see a trend that people are finishing courses just for show off. Quantitative isn't a great thing, I have finished 60+ courses in a period of 4 years, most of them in previous 2 years.

It's ok to show interest in some filed, and to expand your knowledge, but to finish many courses in short time span isn't cool by me.

I want you to hear your opinion on this topic.

Be honest, do you enroll on course for yourself or others?

Some courses I did enroll to get noticed, or to get a possible better position for a job. But 80% courses I have enrolled for myself, and to expand my knowledge. State of accomplishment was only dot on i.
 

Jane

Active Member
I agree with you completely. What is the point of finishing the course to show off if the primary goal of the course is to educate you.
 
Similar threads
Thread starter Title Forum Replies Date
O Study Buddy machine learning and DSA study buddy Study Buddy 2

Similar threads

Top