How helpful are student-generated course reviews?


  • Total voters
    22

Jane

Active Member
I can relate to No. 5: learning by teaching others. One of the great ways how to learn by teaching others is to create the course yourself. Within our e-learning plan I am doing this by creating customized courses for our learners using http://training-online.eu free e-learning platform these days and it works very well for me.
 

Paul Morris

Active Member
I'm not sure I really understand the question raised in the opening post. How do those successfully completing MOOCs use that to 'show off'? Few among my friends, colleagues
or family have any interest, much less knowledge of, MOOCs. I've never come across anyone on the discussion boards hinting at such reasons for enrolling and it would seem a meagre reward for the commitment necessary to complete such courses.

For the vast majority of those with whom I have chatted online the sole reason for taking a MOOC is an interest in (if not a passion for) the subject. A smaller number have some work-related reason or are supplementing formal academic studies (or hope to gain some credit for their MOOC successes).

I enrol in courses that interest me or, occasionally, in order to build foundations for later courses. For example, calculus doesn't really spark much interest in itself but I need to refresh my understanding in order to be able to tackle other courses which do interest me.

I tend to take 3-4 courses in parallel and so, on average, finish about three per month. I been studying MOOCs since early 2013 which would suggest I should have completed around a hundred courses--and that is a fairly accurate estimate. I can't claim to have become vastly knowledgeable in all of the subject areas covered, but wouldn't expect to do so after a single short course, however it was presented. What each course does is add a little more to my knowledge base, open a few more windows to allow me to see new vistas and deepen my appreciation of the vast realms outside my ken. As Albert Einstein is reputed to have said, " The more I learn, the more I realize how much I don't know."
 

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
I agree with you completely. What is the point of finishing the course to show off if the primary goal of the course is to educate you.
Yep, agree with you :) It's trend within young professionals, that they look "smart" let's say. But talking with some professors, they said that they would be frighted if they interview someone who has let's say over 100- 200 certificates. These people are lost in their professional orientation.
 

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
I'm not sure I really understand the question raised in the opening post. How do those successfully completing MOOCs use that to 'show off'? Few among my friends, colleagues
or family have any interest, much less knowledge of, MOOCs. I've never come across anyone on the discussion boards hinting at such reasons for enrolling and it would seem a meagre reward for the commitment necessary to complete such courses.

For the vast majority of those with whom I have chatted online the sole reason for taking a MOOC is an interest in (if not a passion for) the subject. A smaller number have some work-related reason or are supplementing formal academic studies (or hope to gain some credit for their MOOC successes).

I enrol in courses that interest me or, occasionally, in order to build foundations for later courses. For example, calculus doesn't really spark much interest in itself but I need to refresh my understanding in order to be able to tackle other courses which do interest me.

I tend to take 3-4 courses in parallel and so, on average, finish about three per month. I been studying MOOCs since early 2013 which would suggest I should have completed around a hundred courses--and that is a fairly accurate estimate. I can't claim to have become vastly knowledgeable in all of the subject areas covered, but wouldn't expect to do so after a single short course, however it was presented. What each course does is add a little more to my knowledge base, open a few more windows to allow me to see new vistas and deepen my appreciation of the vast realms outside my ken. As Albert Einstein is reputed to have said, " The more I learn, the more I realize how much I don't know."

I agree with you. But there is a trend that young professionals are finishing let's say from 60- 100 courses per year. You really can't get anything in terms of knowledge, if you're working + doing 5- 8 courses per month. That's my point of this topic.

It's positive thing to enroll and to expand knowledge, but let's be serious doing 60- 100 MOOC within a year is just to pump credit's and rating. You really couldn't get as much from the course as from doing few instead, and focusing your energy on them.
 

Paul Morris

Active Member
You really can't get anything in terms of knowledge, if you're working + doing 5- 8 courses per month.

Bear in mind that courses are tending to get shorter (5-6 weeks is becoming more common compared to typical 10-12 week courses a couple of years ago) and many require only a few hours per week. On that basis it would be perfectly possible to complete quite high numbers of courses with a reasonable amount of time and effort.

But talking with some professors, they said that they would be frighted if they interview someone who has let's say over 100- 200 certificates.

It would be madness for a candidate to submit a simple 'data dump' of every course they had ever taken. Doing so would show poor judgement and suggest the inability to filter and present relevant information. This is one of the problems with most online portfolio systems: the inability to produce customised subsets of the full portfolio (the other big problem is that almost no employer or academic is interested, yet, in online portfolios).
 

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
Bear in mind that courses are tending to get shorter (5-6 weeks is becoming more common compared to typical 10-12 week courses a couple of years ago) and many require only a few hours per week. On that basis it would be perfectly possible to complete quite high numbers of courses with a reasonable amount of time and effort.
If you're interested in some topic, let's say you're doing course on Coursera. If course is 5-7 weeks, 3-5 hour week workload, that workload is only for assignments and videos. But if you're interested, you will learn more with optional assignments, lecturers, and books that your professor is providing you. In these terms you need more hours. If you're doing courses just plain following video lectures, and assignments without interaction with community or self search you're just scratching surface from that subject.

It would be madness for a candidate to submit a simple 'data dump' of every course they had ever taken. Doing so would show poor judgement and suggest the inability to filter and present relevant information. This is one of the problems with most online portfolio systems: the inability to produce customized subsets of the full portfolio (the other big problem is that almost no employer or academic is interested said:
I agree that most of the companies don't recognize courses, but the perspective is changing, more and more people are informal learning, and e-Learning is huge aspect of that.
 

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
@Ankit Khandelwal raised great question in our interview. With success rate in many MOOCs is around 7-8% of the people registered, what is your opinion on it?
My view is;
Most of the courses are free, so people enroll don't feel obligated to finish it, because they don't pay for it.
Bad time management is my second argument for not finishing course.

What are your views, on this topic?
 

Carolyn

Founder at MoocLab
Staff member
Group Manager
If you have completed over 20 online courses, then you are entitled to promote yourself to "Expert" in the MoocLab Community. Joining the "Expert" User Group will create an "Expert" flag on your profile which will also be visible when you post in the forums. This allows other members to know who they can seek advice from with confidence.

It's very quick and simple to join the group. Just navigate to the User Group Page by hovering over your user name on the top navigation bar and select "Join User Groups" from the drop down menu. Click on "Join Now" and you're done. Joining the Group will create an "Expert" flag on your profile which will be visible also when you contribute in the forums.

Or you can join right away by clicking here.
 

BMint

Active Member
It takes a certain type of person to want to learn online instaed of via the traditional route. What personality types that are most suited to online education?
 

Carolyn

Founder at MoocLab
Staff member
Group Manager
You raise a great question. I'd like to refer you to our resource "Getting Started with Online Learning" where the fundamental characteristics required for taking online courses are outlined:

Is Online Learning right for me?

You will need to carefully consider the reasons for taking an online course rather than a campus-based one. It takes a lot of self-discipline and motivation to study a course online and you may be required to work without any face-to-face interaction with your teacher or classmates and often with little academic support.

The following list of questions will help you decide if online learning is right for you:

1. Do you have a clear educational goal?

2. Are you good at managing your time?

3. Are you self-disciplined?

4. Are you good at working in isolation?

5. Do you have few other work/life commitments at the moment?

6. Are you able to schedule time to complete assignments without interference?

7. Are you able to take responsibility for accomplishing your assignments?

8. Do you have regular access to a computer and the Internet?


If you answered yes to at least 5 of the above questions, then you are on the right track.

To find out more about studying online, see our Tips & Guides
 

Nedzad

Active Member
Study Buddy
Hi MoocLab members :)

I'm proudly presenting article about me. It's great honor to be a part of Youth Time Magazine (Youth Time magazine - Home) issue August /September.

Youth Time printed magazine, is one of the most imported students magazine in Europe. Monthly
circulation is cca 30.000 magazines
:)

The story of a man who never gets tired of learning.

11990649_777751022334920_2027724697709073899_n.jpg
11986587_777750959001593_5397615081382869478_n.jpg
11953116_777751315668224_5184560492655850873_n.jpg
11954725_777751279001561_8156515567806481057_n.jpg
1538904_777751275668228_7678700488125864203_n.jpg

Dropbox - 30_Best courses_02.pdf
 

MDH

Active Member
Some people hate exams becaquse of all the pressure of revising and worrying about having a "bad day". Others hate coursework because it's hard to get started and you have deadlines.
What do you prefer?
 

Duke

Active Member
I voted coursework as you can work on it at your own pace and there isn't the same stress as with exams when your mind can go blank.
 
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