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edX Structure of Materials, Part 1: Fundamentals of Materials Structure

Massachusetts Institute of Technology via edX

  • Overview
  1. edX
    Platform:
    edX
    Provider:
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology
    Length:
    5 weeks
    Effort:
    6 to 8 hours/week
    Language:
    English
    Credentials:
    Paid Certificate Available
    Overview
    Structure – or the arrangement of materials’ internal components – determines virtually everything about a material: its properties, its potential applications, and its performance within those applications. This course is the first in a three-part series from MIT’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering that explores the structure of a wide variety of materials with current-day engineering applications. Taken together, these three courses provide similar content to MIT’s sophomore-level materials structure curriculum.

    Part 1 begins with an introduction to amorphous materials. We explore glasses and polymers, learn about the factors that influence their structure, and learn how materials scientists measure and describe the structure of these materials. Then we begin a discussion of the crystalline state, exploring what it means for a material to be crystalline, how we describe periodic arrangement of atoms in a crystal, and how we can determine the structure of crystals through x-ray diffraction.

    What you'll learn
    • The structural difference between a glass and a crystal
    • How we describe the structure of amorphous materials
    • What is the structure of glasses and polymers
    • What all crystals have in common and how do we differentiate them
    • The principles of x-ray diffraction that allow us to probe the structure of crystals
    Syllabus
    Part 1: An Introduction to Materials Science
    • Structure of materials roadmap
    • States of matter and bonding
    Part 2: Descriptors
    • Descriptors: concept and function
    • Free volume
    • Pair distribution function
    Part 3: Glasses
    • Glass processing methods
    • Continuous network model
    • Network modifiers
    Part 4: Polymers
    • Random walk model
    • Chain-to-chain end distance
    • Order and disorder in polymers
    Part 5: An Introduction to the Crystalline State
    • Translational symmetry
    • The crystalline state in 2D
    • The crystalline state in 3D
    Part 6: Real and Reciprocal Space
    • Miller indices
    • Real space
    • Reciprocal space
    Part 7: X-Ray Diffraction
    • Bragg’s Law
    • Diffraction examples

    Taught by

    Silvija Gradečak

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